Peggy’s Weaving Tips > Dealing with loom waste

At the Front

A certain amount of your warp cannot be woven into cloth. It’s at each end. At the beginning of the warp, some of the warp is used up in tying the warp onto the cloth beam apron rod (See figure). At the other end, a certain amount is lost to the warp’s being threaded in the heddles on the shafts. The beginning, or front loom waste, might be anywhere from 6-8 inches to 20 inches long, depending upon how thrifty or wasteful you are and on what method you use for tying on. Lacing on, described in my second book, Peggy Osterkamp’s New Guide to Weaving, Number Two: Warping Your Loom & Tying On New Warps, uses the least amount of warp.

Back Loom Waste

Back Loom Waste

At the Back

The loom waste at the back of the loom can be seen in the figure. Large looms have more distance between the beater and the back shaft, so they naturally have more loom waste than a small loom would. To know how much to allow, see the illustration and measure on your loom the distance represented by the arrow. Pull the warp beam’s apron rod up to the heddles on the shaft furthest back on the loom. Measure from there to a few inches in front of the beater, or about 1/2 the distance between the beater and the breast beam. Add a few more inches here if you warp front-to-back, for tying the knots on the warp beam’s apron rod, say, 4-6 inches. Put the front and back loom wastes on the worksheet.

Front Loom Waste

Front Loom Waste

The above information can be found in  “Weaving for Beginners” and Book 1: “Winding a Warp and Using a Paddle

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