22 thoughts on “Peggy Osterkamp Gallery

  1. Wow, Peggy, the silk sculptures in the Gallery are incredible, delicious! I’m trying to imagine the dimensions — how long, for instance?

  2. Peggy, I am blown away by your Ruffles Sculptures. & the ones with cowhair(?). But, it is the Ruffles which keep calling me back.

    I “tend” to prefer “useful” woven items… survived the 60’s & 70’s… I’m sure you get the picture!

    However, these pieces do speak to me as ART. I’m sure another piece will speak differently, later. That is the wonder of art.

  3. Peggy,

    Your website, and your creativity and knowledge, never fails to amaze me. After all these years of weaving on my own, I find both inspiration and new technique as I click my way through your site.

    Thanks for sharing and inspiring. I started weaving almost 20 years ago and warp “the Peggy method”, back to front with a paddle, and use all of your books for problem solving and a teacher over my shoulder.

    Your new work is so refreshing. No, I don’t think I am up for sewing thread, but you go girl!

    • Thanks for your comment. I love hearing what they remind people of00and thanks for your book order, too.
      Peggy

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  5. Peggy, I’ve always loved your weavings and feel the same looking at these. And your website is as stunning and elegant as the weavings. I love your use of creative materials–horsehair, rose hips, thorny rose stems, sewing thread. I love how many weavings have a sculptural effect. You are a wonderful artist and great human being. M

    • Thanks, Maura, for your very kind words. Now, I remember how much you were taken with the sheer silk pieces. Fondly,
      Peggy

  6. I teach and your drafting book was recomended to me as a resource for my new adult students who walked int my fiet class with their i pads. As I have my masters in Art Education with the concentration in textiles, I felt competent in rizing to the occasion and gave them their first homework to search the History of weaving and print it out for 3 of us. PS I am 82 years old.

    • I love teaching, too. That is the mentality I used when writing about drafting. My book, Weaving for Beginners, has a chapter on the subject–geared to the rank beginner and taking them pretty far. My book, Weaving and Drafting Your Own Cloth, goes into drafting in more detail. If you’d like a teacher’s copy of the beginning book, let me know and I’ll send one gratis. I’m sure my email is somewhere on the website so you can send your address to me.
      Peggy (I’m only 72)

  7. Gorgeus sculptures, wow, speechless !!! I ma as well interested in texture and colors in weawing less then patterns.

  8. I just found your website. Awesome!!! I learned to weave in Sweden while my husband was working at Volvo in Goteborg. I loved weaving so much that I bought a Glimakra loom and had it shipped back to the States. The waiting period for a loom from the factory was 9 months, just like having a baby!!! Your work is stunning – I really like the velvet.

  9. Peggy, your gallery is a history of your development as a weaver, from texture and color and now the other items incorporated into the art works. Love the way you are always exploring possibilities. Second row down, far left, looks like the inside of a glowing sea shell.

    I know you will continue to be an inspiration!

  10. Peggy,

    I love how you have combined the twigs etc into you’re weaving and I was looking to do something similar with my work for my uni project and I was just wondering how this was done?

    Many thanks
    Hayley

  11. As I have made a living at my tapestries and supported my down syndrome son, My CPA husband told me never to tell my techniques. Apprentices needed to sign contract not to copy or make tapestries after leaving me. I cannot tell techniques. Lucretia Chase

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