Shopping at Windrush Farm in Petaluma


On that glorious day at the farm where I showed the sheep in my last post, Mimi was asked: “Do you have any wool available?” Here is a woman on her way home with enough wool yarn for several projects–sweaters I think she’ll knit. Different breeds have different types of wool not just different colors. I think I overheard this woman discussing exactly what kind of wool she needed for a special white sweater she was going to knit. 

There was roving ready for spinning or felting in one basket and a container full of balls of yarn from the farm’s sheep and dyed by Mimi. She has a stand during the fall and winter at our Farmers’ Market in Marin County on Sundays. Last week at the market she had balls of roving dyed in a wide range of colors that were being bought up by a woman who does a lot of felting.

Mimi’s assistant is balling up roving (wool from the sheep that has been cleaned and combed to be ready for spinning or felting). The balls are weighed then the price calculated. I was seduced last week at the market to buy a gorgeous ball of roving made of a mixture of grey wool. I plan to use it in felting art pieces.

In the courtyard there were two big tables with sheep pelts. The pelts were set out to dry in the sun. I wondered what the white areas were and was told it was salt to help with the drying. What a wonderful day it was with “thread-head” friends, good food, sunshine, beautiful country and sheep about to lamb! As a weaver I learned a lot, too.

A Wonderful Day at Windrush Farm with the Sheep


Windrush Farm in Petaluma, California specializes in raising sheep for handspinners. They also have spinning classes, summer camps for kids, and “lamb days” every spring so children and parents can mingle with the baby lambs. More information on their website: Windrush Farm

Here they are grazing in the pasture on a simply gorgeous January day.

They came in for dinner and I was able to catch some photos of different breeds. Different types of sheep have differ colors and different types of fleece (wool). In this photo you can see that some have their coats just recently shorn and some haven’t been yet. Mimi said that some refused the shearing the day when the shearer came!

These ewes are about to “lamb” meaning deliver their babies any day now. You can tell because their udders are formed. Some ewes looked pretty fat but the udder is the sure sign. Whether twins or not can’t be predicted.

A couple of lamas are in with the sheep but they don’t mingle much with them. This one wandered in after all the sheep were already deep in their mangers eating. I like the ears and nose!

 

More Fun at the Farm

spinning-yarn-2
It’s always a treat to visit Mimi Luebbermann’s Windrush Farm in Petaluma. When I asked her if she would do a guest post for my blog she mentioned that there will be a spinning class beginning next week–October 1. Just being out in the country is special, but learning how to spin yarn from a sheep’s fleece is the icing on the cake. I think there are two sessions.
Lamb and Boy

She told me about a flea market she has in the fall where people bring what they don’t want to keep in their stashes anymore and take home new stuff. 
I went to her holiday sale and farm day last fall and look forward to going again.

sorting-fleece-2“We have our beginning classes starting next week, Oct 1 and 2, a two part beginning to really get folks spinning.  Then, on October 9, I am having a spin-in day, with spinners coming to the farm to spin and have a potluck lunch and for those folks who wish, a fiber flea market.”

There’s always a Holiday Sale paigegreenpattybrown31314-203at the farm: dyeing, spinning demonstrations and of course, seeing the sheep. (Lambs don’t come until the spring.) I forget when the day is to see the sheep getting sheared–but that is a really nice thing to do, too.