Collages of My Dyed Fabrics


Each composition is made up of fabrics that were in the same dye pot. The differences in the tones are due to the different fabrics I put into the pot. I love these subtle “colors”. The yellows were from woad plants. The browns were from green persimmons over dyed with indigo. I especially find myself liking things that have almost no color at all. One of these is from oak galls. I can’t remember all the specifics but I like to put dyed fabrics in a bath of iron water to “sadden” the color.




My Dyeing Marathon – Experiments with a Variety of Silks and Cottons


Over the holidays I dyed a lot in my very first indigo vat. Lots and lots of dips were necessary to get the different shades. I always used a variety of silks and cottons in each dye bath to get a variety of close tones. I’m thrilled with the results and all the “colors” I could get just by using different cloths.  Then I did similar experiments with saffron, henna and turmeric. It has been fun seeing what I could get. My next post will show some of the art pieces I made using these small pieces. 




Broken Threads Disaster–My Solution

woven-cloth-finest-threads-2
I’m weaving 125 fine threads per inch so I can weave another ruffle (see my gallery) which I will shibori dye with indigo. Then the ruffle will disappear and appear in the dyed and un-dyed areas.   [click any photo to enlarge]
woven-cloth-finest-threads-3

I’m trying to weave with finer-than-ever silk threads. I should have starched them first but didn’t because I didn’t realize it would be necessary. That would have made the threads stronger.  There are 125 threads per inch and I made more threading errors than I’ve ever made in my life. I have spent hours correcting these almost invisible threads and have lost a few and a few have broken –there are 16 threads to date that are hanging off the back of my loom and I expect I’ll have more as I weave along. Here is a close up of the weaving and one broken thread pinned in. (I’ve been mending the threads with sewing thread so I can see them.)
rig-for-broken-threads-2
I used this stand which I’d used when I was weaving velvet to rig up a way to keep all the threads from tangling. Knowing that the only thread that can’t tangle is one under  tension this is what I did.
rig-for-broken-threads-with-cross-1-2
I took the threads as they came from the warp beam and made a cross to keep them in order. 
rig-cross-only-2

 Here is a close-up of the cross I made to keep the threads in order.
rig-for-broken-threads-with-cross-2-2
To further keep them in order they went through this grid.

spools-for-broken-threads-2
Here is how I tensioned the threads. These are fish net shuttles I used when weaving velvet.

Learning New Things with Yoshiko Wada and Elisa Ligon

Straight Persimmon Dye1

Yoshiko Wada and Elisa Ligon


I took a workshop called Shibori and Sublimation Printing on the weekend. It was really inspiring. We were dying on polyester using shibori techniques and dying by sublimation using disperse dyes and a heat press. I hope to use the ideas with my persimmon dyes on silk and cotton.
Straight Persimmon Dye2

Straight Persimmon Dye3
Straight Persimmon Dye4
Straight Persimmon Dye5

Dying with Kakishibu–Green Persimmons

persimmon dye with iron modifier on various fabrics [click to enlarge]

persimmon dye with iron modifier on various fabrics [click to enlarge]


I’ve been interested that I could dye with green persimmons for awhile and I have a friend with persimmon trees. But when I got Chris Conrad’s book, “Kakishibu: Traditional Persimmon Dye of Japan”” and found I could buy the dye already made I was hooked. These are some of my first experiments. I love them and have more pictures for an album we’ll make later. Her book told me all I needed to know to get started.  Visit her website : http://kakishibui.com/

persimmon dye with no iron modifier on various fabrics except for the dark piece in the center [click to enlarge]

persimmon dye with no iron modifier on various fabrics except for the dark piece in the center [click to enlarge]

 

Camp Season Almost Here

Table Looms for Camp
Here are my Structo table looms all ready for the campers later in June. Last year we had great creativity from the 6-11 year-olds. Finally a use for my looms that have been gathering dust n my studio. Last year was a great success so we are going to do it again this year. I always wonder before hand how it will go over. The kids last year were so eager. I made the warps–2 1/2″ wide and then cut cut them off when they are all done and glue the cut ends.

Here Are My Knitted Yarn People

Dolls

Peggy Osterkamp’s Knitted Yarn People – click to enlarge

I stayed up late Christmas Eve to make these yarn figures–had one more to do Christmas morning. They were so much fun and I’m glad I can keep the doll clothes for myself for awhile. I stuffed them with little bean bags I made out of old socks. The stuffing came from old pillows –one with grains of rice and the other, rice hulls. I had a mess to clean up when one or another tipped over in the making.

When is a Present Not a Present? Knitted Doll Sculptures!

Knitted Doll Schulptures > Peggy Osterkamp - [click to enlarge]

Knitted Doll Sculptures > Peggy Osterkamp – [click to enlarge]


I intended these doll clothes I have knitted over the year or so to be Christmas presents. When they turned into art sculptures I knew they needed to be in a group and that meant as of two days before Christmas all of a sudden I didn’t have my gifts anymore! I had planned to make one of the dresses into a paper weight for one gift but when it became a sculpture and I was out of that present. Another dress was a gift, too. I was out two at the last minute.  I won’t say how I resolved my dilemma but the next post will show my little people standing upright in a group.

Little Pieces in “Caskets”

Little Pieces in Caskets - 37
I dyed several pieces I’d woven out of the sheer silk threads that collapse and was thrilled with the results. There are a few more but since they are a dark indigo, they don’t show up as well as in person. I’d woven the pieces in various ways to encourage or control the collapse areas. However, that was a few years ago. When I put them in the indigo dye vat, they all were flat. What wonderful surprises I got.

The reason I call them caskets is the mounting I’ve done. One of them shows the piece in a frame—the frame is made of very thick foam core board for the depth and covered with a frame of mat board with beveled edges on the window. The pieces themselves are stitched to a backing piece of mat board. Then I put a sheet of Mylar over the top and held it in place with a few stitches in the corners. Thus the pieces are protected and encased but in a simple way. They could be framed  more properly later. I plan to show them this way in my show at the Tiburon Library for the month of November.

Note: I had a professional framer cut the foam core frames and the top mats.  I stitched the pieces themselves to the mat board on the backs and cut and stitched on the Mylar myself.

If you click on the images to enlarge them you can really see the loops and textures better.

Little Pieces in Caskets - 47 Little Pieces in Caskets - 45
Little Pieces in Caskets - 35 Little Pieces in Caskets - 39
Little Pieces in Caskets - 42 Little Pieces in Caskets - 29
Little Pieces in Caskets - 27 Little Pieces in Caskets - 41

 

Preparing for Weaving at Camp

Kids Warping Board

Kids Weaving 4

The counsellors and a few of the campers and a parent came to my studio to set up the looms before the camp started. The day of these photos a counsellor made a warp and she and I threaded one of the 7 Structo looms together. Her little brother and his friend came, too, and had fun weaving while we were having fun ourselves setting up the loom. It was a lovely afternoon. [click photos to enlarge]
Kids Weaving 1
Kids Weaving 2Kids Weaving 3

Little Indigo Pieces

Indigo Book Pages

Click to enlarge

I’m thinking of making a book with small pages of my own woven cloth dyed in indigo with clamp resist. The cloth is sheer silk I wove in a crepe weave. It is flat when it is woven and doesn’t crinkle up until it gets wet. Sometimes I wet the cloth before dying and sometimes I let it crinkle when it got wet in the dye vat. This is great fun. The pieces are mounted on small pieces of cloth about 4 1/2″ square. I love these little miniature patches and can’t wait to begin stitching them down.

My Own Large Boro

Boro Peggy's Big
I arranged all the cloth pieces I’ve been dying in the indigo vats from Yoshiko Wada’s Boro workshop to make my own large “boro futon cover”. All the pieces are pinned to a flannel sheet on my pin up wall. Now, the hard part comes: how to get it off to stitch it to a backing fabric. I’m thrilled with the whole process and can’t wait to start stitching.

Video of my “Ruffles in Motion”

Here it is: the video of my ruffle mobile. The three short ruffles are about 18″ long. I like it a lot; however, the juror did not and rejected them. I don’t like to be rejected but like the mobile so much more. Please click the YouTube logo to view in HD on the YouTube page.

Peggy’s Show at the Larkspur Library

DSC00975Nationally, people have known me for my teaching and instructional books about the art and techniques of weaving for 35 years. Few people knew that I was creating art pieces during this long period of time. Now I fee it is time to share my work with art lovers.

I have been interested lately in weaving sheer cloth. When I went to Japan in 2013, I wanted to make something that would show how sheer I could weave cloth. That is how I got the idea of weaving my bookmarks. I enclosed them in a package because I knew that the wrapping of gifts is very important to the Japanese. I received a lot of very good feedback.

 In Japan, I fell in love with a book that had gorgeous holes in the pages where bookworms had eaten the paper. I treasure that book today. I brought home other books with interesting calligraphy that  I thought I might use somehow with my weaving. It was a long time before I realized that my bookmarks would be perfect with their pages. Some of the pages are poetry and some are practice pages for brushwork for calligraphy.  

I love old textiles for the home, too, and grew up with rag rugs  in my mother’s home. When I saw these rag balls in an antique store on Bleeker Street in New York, I was completely smitten and had to have them. I can image the woman who carefully cut the strips and hand stitched the lengths together and them wound these tight balls. All this was in preparation for weaving a rag rug.

I hesitated to unwind the balls to weave a whole rug, but wove these small pieces. I loved handling the “rags” of old, vintage cloth. I added my personal touch  by weaving in horse hair, a material I have been using in recent work.
[click first photo to enlarge]

My Shawl is Finally Done!

Peggy Osterkamp

Peggy Osterkamp (pattern by Stephen West)

 

I finished the shawl last night–there were dozens of tails of yarn that had to be woven in. It would have been finished a month ago, but I started another project right after the knitting was done. Since I will wear it tomorrow night I had to address all the tails now. It took a few night’s work.

I’m pleased with it: the color, the softness, and it stays in place so nicely. The yarn is 30% Silk / 30% Super Baby Alpaca / 30% Extrafine Merino Wool.

Back to the loom now!

 

Peggy Osterkamp

Peggy Osterkamp (pattern by Stephen West)

More “Bookmarks”

Woven Bookmark - Peggy Osterkamp - click to enlarge

Bookmark Hanging – Peggy Osterkamp

 

 

Before I left for Greece I wanted to weave off the warp that was on the loom. I decided to make more bookmarks. [see original bookmark post here] I thought they could be given as special gifts in case someone might be interested in a show. You can see the white wefts I made for the cutting lines. Midway through I thought about trying a black weft and brown horse hair then decided I liked the white better.

When I took the warp off, there wasn’t time to cut so I just pinned it up on my wall–then I thought I liked it the way it was–with none of them cut apart.

So much for planning. that’s the way I like to do it–try something I think will work and see what happens.  Then I said “Oh, that’s the way it is.”

 

 

 

Bookmark Hanging 1

Knitting’s Coming Along with Joey’s Help

Knitted Shawl - Peggy Osterkamp

Knitted Shawl – Peggy Osterkamp

Here’s a progress report of the shawl I began on March 1. (This is only the back). It’s 12 inches long and I’m now binding off with an I-cord binding. Then the stitches on the two sides will be picked up and knitted. Joey often sits beside me when I’m knitting before bedtime.
I am having the time of my life–loving it. I can’t believe all this knitting was done on #1 needles!

Knitting with Joey - Peggy Osterkamp

Knitting with Joey – Peggy Osterkamp

 

Yet Another Color Class

Peggy Osterkamp’s color class watercolor – click to enlarge

I’m taking a color class for ordinary people in an Osher Lifetime Learning class at Sonoma State. It’s mainly for people to be able to put colors together in their own lives–clothes, furnishings, etc. I’ve taken dozens of color classes and hoped this would help mesh all the rules I’ve learned. It has. The teacher is a quilter but she knows how to teach people who have no innate talent for color. Last week we talked about Intensity–and its two aspects. Saturation is how much dye there is (weak or strong) and also how “clean or dirty” the color is.

The page from a book by Gunta Stolzl that I used as my example - click to enlarge

The page from a book by Gunta Stolzl that I used as my example – click to enlarge

When everyone else in the world was watching the Super bowl I went to my studio and tried to paint light colors (unsaturated) as well as a little bit “muddy”–not kindergarten colors. It was fun. I found a page to copy in a book by Gunta Stolzl. It was a challenge to try to mix my paint to match her colors. You can see I didn’t get nearly light enough. Oh well, the next time. My next assignment to myself is to try different values of colors mixed with their complements. She didn’t use the word complements but said they were mixtures of the other 2 primaries. These should be neutrals or colors that are not easy to name.

Photo Shoots of My Weaving

TSA Show Photo John Shooting VeilsOver the holidays I spent a lot of effort getting my entry ready to send to the jury for the Textile Society of America show. There were two photo shoots and much work on getting the entry just right. I submitted two days before the deadline. What a relief! I sent in 3 entries: “Four Veils”, “Heart Sutra No. 1” and “Heart Sutra No. 2” along with details of each.

[click photos to enlarge]

The first photo shows the set up for photographing “Four Veils”. A lot of care was taken to get the lighting just right.

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This photo shows me fiddling at the last minute.
TSA Show Photo John with Japanese PrintThe second shoot was for two of the pieces I did on pages from an old, dilapidated Japanese book. Again, to get them to show up in their frames took special lighting. I’m thrilled with how well the two pieces look. Wish me luck with the jurors. I’ll hear in March. The show will be in September in Los Angeles.Heart_Sutra_no2_Osterkamp_55Heart_Sutra_no1_Osterkamp_21

Peggy’s Weaving Snippets in CD Cases

CD Case 1

CD Case 3My holiday gift shopping is done! My first weaving teacher told us to keep every scrap weever wove. I sort of have–at least saved the sheer scraps I’ve woven. I put them in CD cases and voila!  I like to have the pieces seen from the front and the back so you can see through them, but you could put a paper behind them as a mat. I found an inexpensive easel. They can stand alone or be hung on a nail on the wall.

CD Case 2

 

Sheer Silk Weaving on a Monk’s Prayer

Weaving and japanese page
This is my first piece using one of the books I got in Japan. It is falling apart, so I don’t worry about taking pages from it. I understand it is a book of Monks’ prayers—or it may be just one prayer, I don’t know. I used two adjacent pages for this piece.

I wanted to show how sheer my pieces are. There are two that overlap in the center. The top piece was partially wetted to collapse. The upper part shows how it was woven.

Creating Again: Finally

Pieces on Blue Runner

> click to enlarge

I haven’t created anything since before my trip to Japan in May. In June I had a knee replacement—so finally, I got into my studio yesterday to play around. I’ve been wanting to use scraps of my sheer fabric, but not sure what I would do. I played around, wanting to show how transparent the pieces are. I pinned them up on my wall where my blue table runner was hanging to see what my composition was like. It really looked good on the runner, so I sewed the pieces in place with a few tiny stitches. I had to use the thread I wove them with because sewing thread was too heavy.

I have loved this runner for a long time—finally it can be shown. (It did win a competition many years ago and was in an international show.)

It’s woven with two linen warps used together as one in a dense, warp faced twill. I ironed it very flat using a rolling pin on a breadboard when it was damp from the washing machine. I think you can see the flattened threads when you click to enlarge. I was inspired by Lia Cook’s flattened textiles she made years ago. I think I made this in 1982. (Yikes! That’s over 30 years ago!) It was to be for my mother-in-law but I knew she wouldn’t appreciate it so I never gave it to her!

Weaving with Rose Canes

Rose Canes Woven in Silk Peggy Osterkamp - click to enlarge

Rose Canes Woven in Silk
Peggy Osterkamp
– click to enlarge

I have wanted to combine thorny rose canes with the sheer silk from the beginning of this warp. Kept trying fleeces with no luck and finally I got back to my original idea. I found nice, thin, curvy stems and a few dead blossoms in the bags of cuttings I got when the gardener pruned the rose bushes in January. It looks nice on the wrong side when you see the curved lines through the sheer cloth. From the right side the twigs look fairly thorny and wild. I think it has the feeling of a black and white line drawing. Of course it is a tube.