My Collages Full Size

I had really nice responses to my previous post which showed details of my new collage wall hangings with my dyed fabrics. Now you can see what they are like in reality. There are seven–all 11″ wide and 36″ long.  Now if you want to see details again, you can go back to the first post. Click on these thumbnails to see them full size then click again to see the detail.

Collages of My Dyed Fabrics


Each composition is made up of fabrics that were in the same dye pot. The differences in the tones are due to the different fabrics I put into the pot. I love these subtle “colors”. The yellows were from woad plants. The browns were from green persimmons over dyed with indigo. I especially find myself liking things that have almost no color at all. One of these is from oak galls. I can’t remember all the specifics but I like to put dyed fabrics in a bath of iron water to “sadden” the color.




Broken Threads Disaster–My Solution

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I’m weaving 125 fine threads per inch so I can weave another ruffle (see my gallery) which I will shibori dye with indigo. Then the ruffle will disappear and appear in the dyed and un-dyed areas.   [click any photo to enlarge]
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I’m trying to weave with finer-than-ever silk threads. I should have starched them first but didn’t because I didn’t realize it would be necessary. That would have made the threads stronger.  There are 125 threads per inch and I made more threading errors than I’ve ever made in my life. I have spent hours correcting these almost invisible threads and have lost a few and a few have broken –there are 16 threads to date that are hanging off the back of my loom and I expect I’ll have more as I weave along. Here is a close up of the weaving and one broken thread pinned in. (I’ve been mending the threads with sewing thread so I can see them.)
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I used this stand which I’d used when I was weaving velvet to rig up a way to keep all the threads from tangling. Knowing that the only thread that can’t tangle is one under  tension this is what I did.
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I took the threads as they came from the warp beam and made a cross to keep them in order. 
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 Here is a close-up of the cross I made to keep the threads in order.
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To further keep them in order they went through this grid.

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Here is how I tensioned the threads. These are fish net shuttles I used when weaving velvet.

My Textile Treasures

People have asked me why I am buying something on a trip and what am I going to do with it? My answer has been (to myself) “to have it”. I got inspired to really put away my textiles honorably when I visited a friend I met on the Philippines trip. Here is the result.

Japanese fragments & piece from an obi made of cocoons. Old blouse from Philippines, white wool piece with henna from Morocco, old tape loom. (I had the bars put up when I moved in 6 years ago.)

Japanese fragments & piece from an obi made of cocoons. Old blouse from Philippines, white wool piece with henna from Morocco, old tape loom. (I had the bars put up when I moved in 6 years ago.)

Textiles on shelves and in drawers in sideboard.

Textiles on shelves and in drawers in sideboard.

Blouse from Philippines, belt from Morocco, under kimono from Japan, narrow pieces from Japan, ikat hanging by me.

Blouse from Philippines, belt from Morocco, under kimono from Japan, narrow pieces from Japan, ikat hanging by me.

Drawers in tansu with scarves. Other places for my pj's, etc.

Drawers in tansu with scarves. Other places for my pj’s, etc.

Scarves in drawers of tansu chest. I need discipline to put them away after wearing them.

Scarves in drawers of tansu chest. I need discipline to put them away after wearing them.

Japanese things. Ceremonial kimono with fireflies design, obi made with fan reed, tea pot with fish lever to adjust height. Art piece by Adela Akers.

Japanese things. Ceremonial kimono with fireflies design, obi made with fan reed, tea pot with fish lever to adjust height. Art piece by Adela Akers.

Case with earrings and hair pieces from the Philippines. combs from India, Collage by Milton Sonday, textile art by Adela Akers. Japanese sake bottle and vase.

Case with earrings and hair pieces from the Philippines. combs from India, Collage by Milton Sonday, textile art by Adela Akers. Japanese sake bottle and vase.

Here Are My Knitted Yarn People

Dolls

Peggy Osterkamp’s Knitted Yarn People – click to enlarge

I stayed up late Christmas Eve to make these yarn figures–had one more to do Christmas morning. They were so much fun and I’m glad I can keep the doll clothes for myself for awhile. I stuffed them with little bean bags I made out of old socks. The stuffing came from old pillows –one with grains of rice and the other, rice hulls. I had a mess to clean up when one or another tipped over in the making.

When is a Present Not a Present? Knitted Doll Sculptures!

Knitted Doll Schulptures > Peggy Osterkamp - [click to enlarge]

Knitted Doll Sculptures > Peggy Osterkamp – [click to enlarge]


I intended these doll clothes I have knitted over the year or so to be Christmas presents. When they turned into art sculptures I knew they needed to be in a group and that meant as of two days before Christmas all of a sudden I didn’t have my gifts anymore! I had planned to make one of the dresses into a paper weight for one gift but when it became a sculpture and I was out of that present. Another dress was a gift, too. I was out two at the last minute.  I won’t say how I resolved my dilemma but the next post will show my little people standing upright in a group.

One More Week to See My Gallery Show

My show ends next week–I will be sad to see it come down–LAST DAY is Friday, December 4 at 3:30 pm.
It’s a show I am very proud of–40 pieces and they are very creative (if I do say so myself.) 

Here are times when the gallery at the library is open to see the show. Closed Friday after Thanksgiving.

  • Saturday November 28: 10–5:00
  • Sunday, November 29: noon–5:00
  • Monday, November 30: 10–6:00
  • Tuesday, December 1: 10-noon; 1-3:00–5-7:30
  • Wednesday, December 2: 10-4:00 and 5:00-7:30
  • Thursday, December 3: 10-noon; 2-4:00; 7:30-9:00
  • Friday, December 4 10-3:30–(Last Day!)

People who purchased items can pick them up on Saturday morning when we take  the show down at 11:00 am or get them from me later.

- click to enlarge

– click to enlarge

 

Pictures at My Exibition

Bel-Tib Library Show 2015-5
Here are photos of my show that is up now until December 4th at the Belvedere-Tiburon Library. It’s a lovely venue–really feels almost like an art gallery with the exception that if there is a meeting or activity in the room, no one can see the show.The opening reception was a big success. I made a list of the times the show is available to view for the month. If anyone wants to see the list of times, I can email it to them.
Bel-Tib Library Show 2015-3 Bel-Tib Library Show 2015-2 Bel-Tib Library Show 2015-4 Bel-Tib Library Show 2015-6 Bel-Tib Library Show 2015-8 Bel-Tib Library Show 2015 Bel-Tib Library Show 2015-7 Bel-Tib Library Show 2015-9

Large Boro is Finished

Boro - Large
Now I have all my pieces for my solo show in November done! We hung the Boro today on my wall –the first time it’s been hanging on the board with Velcro I made. Before it was always pinned up on my studio wall. It’s hanging well, thank goodness. The safety pins that hold the three layers together take the light nicely, I think. The blues are all fabrics I dyed in indigo. The brown pieces are from a thick, stiff textile sack used in making sake. I got it in Japan and loved the tannin effect of it.

Now, all that’s left to do for the show is the pricing, inventory lists, contact list and sending out the invitations. I love them–you’ll see it in a post nearer to the opening of the show.

Now I start packing for Morocco!

Little Pieces in “Caskets”

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I dyed several pieces I’d woven out of the sheer silk threads that collapse and was thrilled with the results. There are a few more but since they are a dark indigo, they don’t show up as well as in person. I’d woven the pieces in various ways to encourage or control the collapse areas. However, that was a few years ago. When I put them in the indigo dye vat, they all were flat. What wonderful surprises I got.

The reason I call them caskets is the mounting I’ve done. One of them shows the piece in a frame—the frame is made of very thick foam core board for the depth and covered with a frame of mat board with beveled edges on the window. The pieces themselves are stitched to a backing piece of mat board. Then I put a sheet of Mylar over the top and held it in place with a few stitches in the corners. Thus the pieces are protected and encased but in a simple way. They could be framed  more properly later. I plan to show them this way in my show at the Tiburon Library for the month of November.

Note: I had a professional framer cut the foam core frames and the top mats.  I stitched the pieces themselves to the mat board on the backs and cut and stitched on the Mylar myself.

If you click on the images to enlarge them you can really see the loops and textures better.

Little Pieces in Caskets - 47 Little Pieces in Caskets - 45
Little Pieces in Caskets - 35 Little Pieces in Caskets - 39
Little Pieces in Caskets - 42 Little Pieces in Caskets - 29
Little Pieces in Caskets - 27 Little Pieces in Caskets - 41

 

Little Indigo Pieces

Indigo Book Pages

Click to enlarge

I’m thinking of making a book with small pages of my own woven cloth dyed in indigo with clamp resist. The cloth is sheer silk I wove in a crepe weave. It is flat when it is woven and doesn’t crinkle up until it gets wet. Sometimes I wet the cloth before dying and sometimes I let it crinkle when it got wet in the dye vat. This is great fun. The pieces are mounted on small pieces of cloth about 4 1/2″ square. I love these little miniature patches and can’t wait to begin stitching them down.

My Own Large Boro

Boro Peggy's Big
I arranged all the cloth pieces I’ve been dying in the indigo vats from Yoshiko Wada’s Boro workshop to make my own large “boro futon cover”. All the pieces are pinned to a flannel sheet on my pin up wall. Now, the hard part comes: how to get it off to stitch it to a backing fabric. I’m thrilled with the whole process and can’t wait to start stitching.

Indigo Dying in the Boro Class

Indigo Papers

If you are viewing this in an email you may not see everything I put in this post, for example, a photo gallery. Please click the post title above to see the whole post.

Yoshiko wanted us to be able to make our own indigo vats at home and her method seems doable, even to me. I am so excited about what we got in the class (and an extra day on our own) that I will surely make a vat of my own. You can see from the photos why I’m so excited. We did clamping and stitch resist and dipping multiple times. I dyed pages from an old Japanese book I have and scraps of my own weaving and a wonderful white  silk cloth that I bought long ago to make an outfit.The picture of the used clamps just look nice and arty, so I included it. More of our dying results are in the previous Boro class post.

Video of my “Ruffles in Motion”

Here it is: the video of my ruffle mobile. The three short ruffles are about 18″ long. I like it a lot; however, the juror did not and rejected them. I don’t like to be rejected but like the mobile so much more. Please click the YouTube logo to view in HD on the YouTube page.

A New Wrinkle for My Ruffles

Peggy Osterkamp - Ruffles in Motion

Peggy Osterkamp – Ruffles in Motion – [click to enlarge]


It was thrilling to see these little ruffles float and rotate in the air today when they were photographed. I am entering this piece in a show–deadline is day-after-tomorrow. I hope the juror likes it. (I don’t like being rejected). Submitting entries for juried shows is really hard for me. The technology needed to fit all the requirements is daunting. Thankfully I have wonderful help. A video is coming soon. It really looks nice as the components spin around independently.
Peggy Osterkamp - Ruffles in Motion-Detail 1Peggy Osterkamp - Ruffles in Motion-Detail 2

Lisa Kokin Show in Mill Valley Gallery

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Lisa’s work stunned me, thrilled me, inspired me. The pieces represent pages from books with zipper teeth for the text and a little embroidery for the images. Ethereal “pages” she skillfully made by machine stitching then dissolving the medium that she stitched on. They are glorious. Some works were done on old linen cloth, but I liked the gauzy ones best. There was story attached, too, which added depth to the whole experience.The exhibit at the Seager/Gray Gallery, in Mill Valley, CA, closes on October 30 and is not to be missed.   [click first photo to see slide show]

Peggy’s Show at the Larkspur Library

DSC00975Nationally, people have known me for my teaching and instructional books about the art and techniques of weaving for 35 years. Few people knew that I was creating art pieces during this long period of time. Now I fee it is time to share my work with art lovers.

I have been interested lately in weaving sheer cloth. When I went to Japan in 2013, I wanted to make something that would show how sheer I could weave cloth. That is how I got the idea of weaving my bookmarks. I enclosed them in a package because I knew that the wrapping of gifts is very important to the Japanese. I received a lot of very good feedback.

 In Japan, I fell in love with a book that had gorgeous holes in the pages where bookworms had eaten the paper. I treasure that book today. I brought home other books with interesting calligraphy that  I thought I might use somehow with my weaving. It was a long time before I realized that my bookmarks would be perfect with their pages. Some of the pages are poetry and some are practice pages for brushwork for calligraphy.  

I love old textiles for the home, too, and grew up with rag rugs  in my mother’s home. When I saw these rag balls in an antique store on Bleeker Street in New York, I was completely smitten and had to have them. I can image the woman who carefully cut the strips and hand stitched the lengths together and them wound these tight balls. All this was in preparation for weaving a rag rug.

I hesitated to unwind the balls to weave a whole rug, but wove these small pieces. I loved handling the “rags” of old, vintage cloth. I added my personal touch  by weaving in horse hair, a material I have been using in recent work.
[click first photo to enlarge]

Gorgeous Fragments at the LA County Museum

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There was a small but smashing exhibit of fragments that everyone was told to see and it was superb. “Fragmentary Tales: Selections from the Lloyd Cotsen Textile Traces Collection” . The pieces were mounted in what looked like foam core board with windows cut out for the textiles that gave each one a presence so it could be appreciated. This is how I mounted lots of my study pieces when I was teaching. I put a Mylar cover on them that could be lifted up and the textile lifted out. That was how the Met was mounting things in their collection at the time. Here are the ones that I really loved: A velvet from Uzbekistan, an African piece, an Italian Velvet and a scaffolded piece from Peru–the likes of which I’ve never seen. The contemporary piece with horse hair by Debra Warner, “Opens a Window”, especially inspired me.  [click photos to enlarge]

 

A Visit to The Realm of Nature: Bob Stocksdale & Kay Sekimachi

Seckimachi RufflesOn Sunday we took a post symposium tour to San Diego’s Mingei International Museum, to see the show that opened the night before. Kay was there to greet us and she and Signe Mayfield took us on a gallery tour. The show is gorgeous and has lots of work from both Kay and Bob. There were pieces that I remember seeing on exhibit when I was getting started in the mid-70’s. I’ve always admired her work–it is beautiful and it is woven. These two pieces are well known and it was a treat to get to see several of them in person again. In the afternoon Melissa Leventon gave a talk about Kay’s work. I was thrilled to tears that Melissa reconized me by showing my ruffles in the last slide. It was to show Kay’s influence on the artists coming up.
In the realm of Nature

THE OPENING: ALL I COULD HAVE WISHED FOR

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Peggy Osterkamp

Saturday night was the opening reception and end of the TSA Symposium. For me it was glorious in every way. My pieces were in the most prime location: in the front window and the first thing to be seen in the show. When it got dark the lighting was great with reflections in the window.

I stood nearby and got lots and lots of nice comments. The nicest part was getting praise from other artists and people who knew me or knew my name.
> click photos to enlarge

 

Textile Society of America Symposium, Day One

Serena Lee

Serena Lee

 

I met two former students who are very accomplished.
Serena Lee, from San Francisco, was my Home Ec student when she was in the seventh grade. She is giving a lecture at the symposium about ethnic dress of the Lolo/ Yi groups across the Vietnam- China border. I heard her practice her riveting talk this morning. She leads textile trips to that area of the world and is an expert on the various ethnic costumes.

 

 

 

Laurel Wilson

Laurel Wilson

Laurel Wilson, PhD was my weaving student in New York where she became interested in textiles. Her dissertation is ” ‘De Novo Modo’: the birth of Fashion in the Middle Ages”. She is passionate about her research and has given lectures around the country. Her concentration is on 14th century and how the introduction of the horizontal pedal loom in the 11th century caused big changes in class structure , gender relations, and ultimately the birth of fashion in Western Europe. It was fascinating to listen to what all she had to say.

 

Zvezdana Dode

Zvezdana Dode

I sat under an umbrella this afternoon with Zvezdana Dode from Stravropol, Russia who I met on the Italy trip. She is working on a book : ” ‘Silk Horde’: Costume and Textiles of the Mongolian Empire”. She is also giving a paper here at the symposium and was so interesting to talk to.
So, there are a lot of experts here and everyone is passionate about textiles.

 


Tonight was a reception with the menu planned by Alice Waters. I was thrilled to have the rest of the world experience her local grown sustainable foods. There was an almost full moon and lots of interesting people. It was really nice when someone I didn’t know knew my name.
Full Moon Reception

A Wonderful Surprise: The Show Has a Catalog

I discovered the catalog for the show by accident last night when a friend emailed me to say it was a nice catalog. And it is very nice. But the best part is that there is a catalog at all–that makes the show have more meaning and importance. Also very nice are the nice words at the beginning and each artist has a whole page. My page is Page 16.

TSA Catalog Screncap“The Craft & Folk Art Museum is proud to host New Directions: A Juried Exhibition of Contemporary Textiles, featuring current technical, aesthetic and structural innovations in textile art.”
“The illustrious jury panel selected 19 established and emerging artists whose work reflects the shifts and future movements in textile art.”
Suzanne Isken, Executive Director, Craft & Folk Art Museum

[click cover image to view or download catalog]