Double Weave for Dummies and Virgins: Part 3 the treadling sequences

Introduction:
Part 1 was the post on April 30, 2021, and Part 2 was on July 10, 2021. You can click on the links here.

Note: the treading for this series of posts is a straight draw: 1,2,3,4. Etc.

The sequence for weaving two separate layers is this:

  1. Weave the two sheds for the top layer with one shuttle. See below.
  2. Weave the two sheds for the bottom layer with the other shuttle. See below.

The sequence for weaving two separate layers can be written this way:
T
T

B
B

To weave the top layer:
You will weave two sheds for the top layer with one of the shuttles.

  1. Lift one of the shafts assigned to the top layer—in this case, lift shaft 1. Throw the shuttle that matches the color of the warps lifted.
  2. Change to the other shaft (shaft 3) designated for the top layer and throw the same shuttle in that shed.

To weave the bottom layer:
This is the principle of weaving all double weaves—you’ll use this principle for all the double weave variations.

To weave the bottom layer, first lift the shafts for the top layer (shafts 1 and 3). Add to those shafts one of the shafts designated for the bottom layer (your choice, lift shaft 2 or 4)—a total of three shafts will be lifted to create the first shed for the bottom layer. Throw the second shuttle. The second shed for the bottom layer uses the same principle: Lift the shafts for the top layer and also lift the remaining shaft for the bottom layer (either 2 or 4—the one you didn’t lift first.) Throw the second shuttle again.

Note that with a floor loom the shafts all fall down when you take your foot off the pedals, but with a table loom you have to raise and lower each shaft individually—and that means lowering shafts when you change to a new shed.



To weave a tube, you’ll use only one shuttle, and it will go from the top layer to the bottom layer in a different sequence, which will close the layers at the edges of the warp, forming the tube.

It’s the sequence of sheds that makes the edges join as well as using only one shuttle.

                T
                B
                T
                B

Visualize how the shuttle will go from the top layer to the bottom to the top again and to the bottom, which will form a tube as shown in the illustration.



Again, the principle for weaving the top and bottom layers doesn’t change. This time, it’s the path the weft takes that joins one edge of the warp so that the cloth can be opened out to twice as wide as the warp. Only one shuttle is used for double width.
To weave double width:
                T
                B
                B
                T
Try to visualize the path of the shuttle in the illustration. Use the principle that the shuttle weaves one top shed, then one bottom shed, then the other bottom shed and lastly, the remaining to shed. The fold will form on the edge opposite from where you entered your shuttle to begin the sequence. There are many techniques to make the fold less visible on page 256 of Weaving for Beginners.



5 thoughts on “Double Weave for Dummies and Virgins: Part 3 the treadling sequences”

  1. This is great. My loom is counterbalance (lifts 2 shafts on single treadle) will this work or do I need to change my treadles to lift one at a time?

    I can hardly wait to give this a try!

    Reply
    • Yes, you will need to retie your treadles. You can weave double weave on a counterbalance loom but the sheds are a little hard to find until you realize where they are. In other words on the sheds where 2 shafts are not up and 2 down you will see more than one small shed. You’ll just need to realize which of these little sheds is the right one. You will do this immediately without any worry. Now, the tie up that I suggest so often on my blog and in my books is once you make it you can weave every possible shed without ever having to re tie the treadles again. You can make all the possible combinations using two feet and in a way that lets you walk the treadles by alternating feet for most weaves. You’ll use FOUR treadles. Beginnning on the left tie the first treadle to shaft 1. The next treadle tie to shaft 3. The third to shaft 4 and the right hand treadle to shaft 2. In your mind, practice with your feet for a 12 twill. you’ll do 12, then 23, then 34, then 41. Soon you’ll be dancing! for tabby you’ll press 13 with your foot in the crack to press both treadles with the left foot. 24 will be with the right foot.
      Weaving double weave is wonderfully satisfying, so practice the treadles and it will become routine soon. Have fun. All of this is in my book, Weaving for Beginners.
      Peggy

      Reply
      • Thank you for the information. I have retied the treadles but ran into a snag. I tied the treadles as described above but when I press the treadles the shaft goes down. A second issue is the shaft are now getting a bit hung up. I am thinking since the shafts are counter balance (1st & 2nd, 3rd & 4th) that I actually need to tie the 2nd shaft on the first treadle which will raise the 1st, and so forth. I have 6 treadles, I am thinking I should probabay use the middle four treadles and drop the two outer ones.

        Does this make sense to you?

        Reply

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