Japan Tour 2017 – Day 10


Day 10. Tiny Patterns Woven at Miyako Traditional Crafts Research Center. It was impossible to imagine these patterns were tied and dyed (ikat) until we saw how it was done.


Imagine whole kimonos woven with such fine patterns! It was thrilling to see how it was done.



This is what I hoped to see and it was hanging to dry after being dyed with indigo. This woven thick piece is how the tiny white patterns are made. In the photo all the places where there is weaving resisted the indigo blue dye and remain white when this thick mat is unwoven. The unwoven threads with the tiny white areas are then put on the loom and the real cloth is woven.

marmarweaves commented: This is pretty unbelievable, if you had not seen it and shown it, it would be more than one could imagine. Astonishing. Thanks Peggy for taking us along.



Here you can see the mat being unwoven and the threads have white areas where they were originally woven to resist the blue dye.



Here the threads are on the loom about to be woven into cloth for a kimono.



Here is a pattern piece ready for the dye pot. You can see the pattern that will eventually be woven into cloth.



On the loom if a thread isn’t exactly lined up it has to be tightened or loosen to be in the right place. The weaver watches carefully with every row.



Here is a close up of the edge of the piece woven and ready to dye. Bundles of threads are woven. Where the threads float is where the dye will sink in. Where they are woven will be too tight and won’t allow the dye to penetrate causing the small white patterns.


 

5 thoughts on “Japan Tour 2017 – Day 10

  1. OH, my! What a fun and interesting post! Thank you for sharing these beautiful photos on your wonderful travels!

  2. Such exact detail – fantastic. It is nice to see how they do it…this answers some questions – thanks for sharing Peggy.

  3. reminds me a little of the class we were in with Catherin Ellis several years ago. You sat next to me.
    Judy Anderson

  4. This is very different from Ikat dying in other parts of Asia. Thanks so much for showing the details of this weave!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *