My Japan Weaving Tour – Day 1 / Part 2

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Day 1 / Part 2 – More About Meisen Weaving in Chichibu. This is the front of a brochure from the studio we visited: Arakei Textile. An image is printed on a warp.


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First temporary wefts are woven very far apart in a warp of white threads. Then the extremely loosely woven cloth is taken to the printing table. Here you can barely see one weft on a diagonal. See the next photo.


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Here you can see that temporary weft in this photo of the printed warp. I brought home a piece of the printed warp. The warp threads are barely held in place by the temporary weft–just enough so the warp can be put into the loom. If I disturb these printed threads they will separate some so they must stay put or all the threads could get out of line.


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Here you can see on the loom where the cloth has been woven and also the printed warp threads not yet woven.


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These young women were wearing lovely kimonos of Meisen fabric while shopping in the showroom on the day we were there. I am not on a tour for this trip but am traveling with my travel partner on many previous tours. Dear friends drove us to Chichibu which is three hours from Tokyo.


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2 thoughts on “My Japan Weaving Tour – Day 1 / Part 2

  1. i always wondered how the warps were held together for printing. I knew they were woven first but did not understand they were so loosely woven. mystery solved! enjoy your trip- it can’t be helped!

  2. This is fascinating; I’ve never heard of the technique. How do they re-attach the cloth to the loom after printing without distorting the weave? I would think it would be difficult to tie on and keep everything in exact alignment.

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