Weaving Class: Sheds Too Small

The other day a student complained that the boat shuttle I loaned her was too big for the sheds on her table loom. I suggested that she throw the shuttle closer to the heddles and advance the warp often. The reason is that the shed is bigger the closer it is to the heddles (shafts). It’s obvious that the shed is small when it is closer to the fell of the cloth (the place where the last weft is woven).

A New (sort-of-old) Piece!

Ruffle Number 1: Turn it horizontally

This is my first ruffle, maybe a year or two “old”. Today a special friend held it horizontally–it looked fabulous! I’m thrilled to be entering it in an exhibit where there will be mostly painters. I think it will hold its own in the show. There will be 144 pieces. I’ll keep you posted. Be sure to look at it horizontally (turn it 90 degrees).

Detail, Ruffle No. 1: Turn it 90 degrees.

 

 

More About My New Warp

Two Kitesticks and Horse Hair (click to enlarge)

Close-up of Kitestick (click to enlarge)

I’m  using a supplementary warp (egg plant color) for the punch. The technique for the supplementary warp I’ll use is split broche. The threads will not be in the heddles as they are threaded amongst the warp threads which on are 4 shafts. More on this when I get started.  For now, you can see those threads on their own small kitestick.
I think I’ll put in some horse hair–I love the color of it.

 

My New Warp

Sewing Thread Warp (click to enlarge)

Here is my new warp–sewing thread–for some art pieces. More ruffles, probably. You can see the 10 spools that I used on my warping reel with a heck block. Otherwise, for 10 spools you would definitely need to use a paddle (which is a good idea). See my book, Winding a Warp & Using a Paddle). The warp is on its kitestick, ready to load the raddle.

Spools for Warp (click to enlarge)

I’m using sewing thread and hoping for sheer again. I increased the sett a bit from the yellow warp so I won’t have to beat so gently to get the wefts not to pack in too much.
I’m making separate selvedges out of white rayon and using a supplementary warp (egg plant color) for the punch. The technique for the supplementary warp I’ll use is split broche. The threads will not be in the heddles as they are threaded amongst the warp threads which on are 4 shafts. More on this when I get started.  For now, you can see those threads on their own small kitestick.
I think I’ll put in some horse hair–I love the color of it.

 

 

A Diagonal I Like

Japanese Sample: Diagonal

I have an old Japanese weaver’s sample book–a treasure given to me by my special friend and mentor, Helen Pope. I have it opened to the page with this glorious diagonal. Somehow, it seems beautifully simple to me. I see that the piece of cloth is cut on the bias. I think surface design techniques could create diagonals, too. I think what I love it it’s boldness.

Japanese Sample Book Pages

Bias Diagonal Close Up (click to enlarge)

A Color Lesson I Forgot

White Border Too Big (click to enlarge)

I wove what I hoped would be a narrow band to be sort of a border separating parts of my wavy wefts cloth. I used white because that was what the warp is and  it would blend in since a lot of white shows in the wavy wefts cloth. I forgot that light colors really advance and actually look larger than darker ones. I made my “border” 2 inches tall–it looked much wider. In fact it sticks out like a sore thumb.

Narrow Borders Look Better

What to do–it came near the beginning of my proposed hanging. Well, since the lam broke, it made me stop and think about it. I cut off what was woven and made narrow hems which look much better.  In the illustration the wide border is a little rigged up, but it shows an inch of white. Originally the border was 2″ tall and really looked too big. But that lesson of light colors looking larger really came home to me.

 

Wavy Wefts Bibliography

Wavy Wefts, detail (click to enlarge)

Here is a list of books I’ve found with information on wavy wefts. There are a number of ways to accomplish it.

Collingwood, Peter. “Two Weft Distortion Effects in Plain Weave”. The Journal for Weavers, Spinners and Dyers. Number 36, December 1960.

Collingwood, Peter, article above reprinted in: The Journal for Weavers, Spinners and Dyers, Peter Colllingwood Special Edition. Summer 2009.

Straub, Marianne. Hand Weaving and Cloth Design. New York: Viking Press, 1977. pages 86-87.

Sutton, Ann., The Structure of Weaving. London: 1982. pages 50-51.

Sutton, Ann, and Sheehan, Diane. Ideas in Weaving. Loveland, CO: Interweave Press, 1989. pages 104, and 97-101, special reeds.